The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
— Volume 1, Issue 2, February 2009
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Compounding of a range of chemotherapy products is now being carried out by the world’s first automatic compounder at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Ann Jacklin, chief pharmacist at the trust, explains how it works.
If pharmacy is to develop as a clinical profession it must follow the same rules as other healthcare professions. Paul Grassby explains what these are.
Ranolazine, launched this month for chronic stable angina, has entered a therapeutic marketplace with stiff competition. Helen Williams describes its clinical evidence and likely place in practice.
Alitretinoin (Toctino) was launched for the treatment of severe hand eczema towards the end of last year. Christine Clark describes the evidence behind it and what pharmacists need to know about its use.
There is an increasing prevalence of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection. Co-infected patients are more likely to experience progression of latent TB to active disease and consequently develop AIDS. Jennifer Milne describes the therapeutic management of these patients and the important drug interactions.
By Steve Williamson and David Thomson.
Prescriber’s Corner describes examples of situations encountered by pharmacist prescribers and invites you to consider what action you would take. In this case, a patient with cardiovascular risk factors has been prescribed long-term diclofenac for chronic back pain. By Andrew Husband and Jessica Clemerson.
Improving the safety of injectable medicines is on the agenda of every acute hospital trust. One strategic health authority has developed a regional initiative to standardise the risk assessment of these products and increase purchasing power. Clare Crowley describes the benefits of collaborative working.
For pharmacy to evolve as a clinical profession, the CPD structure laid down by the new General Pharmaceutical Council must prepare pharmacists for periodic re-registration, says Philip Brown.