The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
— Volume 1, Issue 4, April 2009
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The European Association of Hospital Pharmacists (EAHP) is the latest pharmacy organisation to take the plunge into the virtual world Second Life. Shona Kirk pays them a visit and investigates progress with other virtual pharmacy projects. By Shona Kirk.
Patient access to eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, may be more transparent following new arrangements for central commissioning. Simon Keady, Simon Cheesman and Richard Kelly outline the drug’s pharmacology and evidence for use.
This April saw the start of a new central funding pathway for the monoclonal antibody eculizumab, for the treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. In this article, staff from St James’ Hospital, Leeds and University College London Hospital describe how the new service will work. By Richard Kelly, Peter Hillmen and Louise Arnold.
Martin Stephens explains the importance of clinical leadership in improving patient care, and why this refers to pharmacists at all levels of practice.
Much debate surrounding the establishment of the new professional body for pharmacy seems to be missing the point. Rather than becoming preoccupied with restricted titles, we need to concentrate on sector-wide collaboration to provide the best clinical care to patients, says Philip Brown.
Personalising medicines according to a patient’s genetic makeup is becoming easier with increasing knowledge and commercially available tests, yet it is not routinely used in clinical practice. Attendees at the EAHP congress heard why pharmacists should help advocate such tests. By Hannah Pike.
Prescriber’s Corner describes situations encountered by pharmacist prescribers and invites you to consider clinical decisions about the patient. In this case, you are managing a patient with rheumatoid arthritis who is either intolerant of, or unresponsive to, standard drug treatment. By Andrew Husband and Richard Copeland.
Trisodium citrate has recently been introduced as a catheter-locking solution in Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge. Jo Jenkins, Clare Daniels and Nick Pritchard describe the impact this has had on reducing catheter-related infections in patients receiving haemodialysis.
Outpatients taking oral chemotherapy need careful counselling. Reshenthie Govender describes the early benefits from a pilot study to establish a standard counselling procedure and improve the experience for patients taking capecitabine at a specialist oncology centre.
Involving clinical pharmacists in the training programme for junior doctors can be beneficial for both the doctors and the pharmacy department. Alyson Williamson describes the approach taken by one trust and the feedback received to date.